Read Agewise: Fighting the New Ageism in America by Margaret Morganroth Gullette Online

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Let’s face it: almost everyone fears growing older. We worry about losing our looks, our health, our jobs, our self-esteem—and being supplanted in work and love by younger people. It feels like the natural, inevitable consequence of the passing years, But what if it’s not? What if nearly everything that we think of as the “natural” process of aging is anything but?In AgewiLet’s face it: almost everyone fears growing older. We worry about losing our looks, our health, our jobs, our self-esteem—and being supplanted in work and love by younger people. It feels like the natural, inevitable consequence of the passing years, But what if it’s not? What if nearly everything that we think of as the “natural” process of aging is anything but?In Agewise, renowned cultural critic Margaret Morganroth Gullette reveals that much of what we dread about aging is actually the result of ageism—which we can, and should, battle as strongly as we do racism, sexism, and other forms of bigotry. Drawing on provocative and under-reported evidence from biomedicine, literature, economics, and personal stories, Gullette probes the ageism that drives discontent with our bodies, our selves, and our accomplishments—and makes us easy prey for marketers who want to sell us an illusory vision of youthful perfection. Even worse, rampant ageism causes society to discount, and at times completely discard, the wisdom and experience acquired by people over the course of adulthood. The costs—both collective and personal—of this culture of decline are almost incalculable, diminishing our workforce, robbing younger people of hope for a decent later life, and eroding the satisfactions and sense of productivity that should animate our later years.Once we open our eyes to the pervasiveness of ageism, however, we can begin to fight it—and Gullette lays out ambitious plans for the whole life course, from teaching children anti-ageism to fortifying the social safety nets, and thus finally making possible the real pleasures and opportunities promised by the new longevity. A bracing, controversial call to arms, Agewise will surprise, enlighten, and, perhaps most important, bring hope to readers of all ages....

Title : Agewise: Fighting the New Ageism in America
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780226310732
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 304 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Agewise: Fighting the New Ageism in America Reviews

  • Bonnie M. Benson
    2019-03-05 02:18

    A good book on ageism. Echoes a lot she covered in "Declining to Decline" (a worthy read). Best parts:Part One peels back the ageisms we're not even conscious of; in Part Three, the section of forgetfulness is great - especially, in light of the constant media bombardment that memory loss is a sure sign of Alzheimer's, dementia, etc.

  • Jill Shubilla
    2019-03-06 03:00

    Margaret Gullette takes an earnest approach towards the subject of ageism. As a scholar in the Women’s Studies Research Center at Brandeis University and as a professor of Age Studies in her home town of Newton, Massachusetts, Gullette strives to inform those of all ages who are directly and indirectly affected by the common negative stereotypes surrounding the natural progress of aging. One major concern in recent society is the theory that aging in general is bad, that death itself is more preferable than growing older than the age of 50. Even growing after the age of 30 is beginning to seem dangerous to younger members of our society. Margaret Gullette does not want her readers to fear aging but to instead fear the negative connotations related to cultural ageism. She calls for everyone to make a stand to actively fight against the current conventional images that surround aging today, that aging need not be something to dread and fear. As an added bonus, several popular factual and fictional pieces of literature about the challenges of getting older are scattered throughout the book to help readers gain an easier understanding of Gullette’s point of view. This book would be excellent for visitors in a public library looking for social commentary rather than those of a university library reading for coursework purposes. The author is rather opinionated, and while she fights for a good cause, this is not something students should peruse for an academic paper without having something to compare.

  • Lauren
    2019-03-17 04:12

    A densely written but important analysis of contemporary ageism. Debunking the decline narrative of aging was a central theme that stayed with me.